Pediatric dentistry of cape coral

5 Benefits of Visiting a Pediatric Dentist

The Difference

Let’s face it – for some in past years visiting the dentist wasn’t the most fairy tale experience.  Put your mind to ease by selecting a multi award winning practice and the most loved pediatric dentist in Southwest FloridaDr. Tim Verwest, DMD & Associates who are specially trained and board certified for treating pediatric patients.

While general dentists can perform the same work, visiting a pediatric dentist provides a slew of extra benefits:

Office Decor 

We’ve got fun just about everywhere you look! From video games, to community initiatives and educational lobby experiences for children of all ages to enjoy!

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Better Training

Kids aren’t always the most cooperative of patients.  A pediatric dentist has at least two additional years of training beyond dental school solely focused on treating young patients.

In the additional training, the focus is on child psychology, growth/development, and learning all of the tips and tricks of the trade for examining and treating children.

Specialized Treatment

In the circumstance that your child needs more comprehensive dental treatment, pediatric dentists are specially trained to handle special needs and to children with extensive dental treatment needs.

Oral Health Care Education

Since Pediatric Dentistry of Florida’s staff work solely with kids,  we know how to engage in educational learning.  Even more, we have props and teaching tools that are appropriate for all ages. To become part of our dental family, please fill out the form below and we will contact you immediately as possible. Thank you and we look forward to serving you!

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Local Dentist Named One of America’s Best

The National Consumer Advisory Board has named Pediatric Dentistry of Florida, Dr. Tim M. Verwest, DMD one of America’s best dentist for 2018. Dr. Verwest selection is based on a proprietary assessment of a dentists experience, training, continuing education, and commitment to excellence to ensure the most impartial unbiased review of all applicants.

Dr. Verwest is a board certified diplomat of the National Board of Pediatric Dentistry with professional interests in the areas of pediatric pharmacology, biomaterials, and pediatric anesthesia.  He believes in lifelong learning and continues his education by taking courses in pediatric sedation, pediatric oncology, sealants, prosthetics, pediatric cosmetic dentistry, pediatric materials, childhood growth and development, and more.

Pediatric Dentistry of Florida, Dr. Tim Verwest, DMD & Associates continues to provide pediatric dental care to children for the last 26 years. Areas of service include comprehensive dental exams, cleanings, composite fillings, dental hygiene education, extractions, fluoride treatments, sealants, sedation dentistry, space maintainers, x-rays and tooth nerve treatment. For more information, visit www.DrVerwest.com or (239) 482-2722.

 

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Contact:

Jeffrey Shafer, Director of Marketing, (239) 482-2722 x 209, communityoutreach@drverwest.com

Touch-A-Truck 2018 was a success!

We want to give a huge thank you to everyone who came out to Touch-A-Truck this year! It wouldn’t be anything without the help out staff and participants to make it all happen, and of course with all the support from our amazing patients. We are grateful to have all of you apart of our family and look forward to making more fun memories in the future!

Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Happy National Oral Cancer Awareness Month from your friends at Pediatric Dentistry of Florida! We enjoy looking out for anyone of all ages and hope to raise awareness, along with having friends and family being conscious of this topic as well.

Oral Cancer

Oral Cancer includes any and all cancers of the mouth such as the tongue, the cheeks, and lips as well as the throat, sinuses, and other parts within the head and throat. The cancer, which often appears as a growth within the mouth, is caused by a mutation and growth in cells that can often then spread into other parts of the body.

By the Numbers

  • Approximately 45,750 people will be newly diagnosed in 2015
  • Of the 45,750 people diagnosed only about half will survive the next 5 years
  • 1 person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day
  • 115 people are newly diagnosed each day
  • IF DETECTED EARLY, a person’s survival rate increases to 80-90%

Who is at Risk?

Oral Cancer is twice as common in men as in women. In addition, those who chew or smoke tobacco, drink alcohol excessively, or are exposed to sunlight for long periods of time are more likely to develop Oral Cancer. While the average age for diagnosis is 62, this cancer can affect all ages. In addition, scientists have recently connected poor diet habits such as those without consistent fruit and vegetable intake to be at higher risk for developing this cancer. While it is certainly important to consider these risks, it’s also important to note that one in four of those diagnosed with Oral Cancer did not fall into any of the above risk factors.

The Power of Prevention

“Historically the death rate associated with this cancer is particularly high not because it is hard to discover or diagnose, but due to the cancer being routinely discovered late in its development.” – Oral Cancer Foundation

Teeth Grinding Is For All Ages

What’s The Harm?

Teeth grinding can cause fractring, loosening, or loss of teeth. It can even wear your teeth down to nearly nothing. In this case, bridges, crowns, or dentures may be needed to restore/replace the teeth. In addition, chronic grinding can also affect your jaw and cause a change in the appearance of your face.

What Can I Do About It?

An easy solution is asking your dentist to fit you with a mouth guard. This will protect your teeth while you sleep. In some cases your dentist may recommend taking a muscle relaxant before you go to bed each night.

Teeth grinding is often caused by stress or sleep disorders. If you grind your teeth due to stress, ask your doctor about options to reduce stress. If you’re grinding due to a sleeping disorder, treating the sleeping disorder may eliminate or reduce your grinding.

What If My Child Grinds His/Her Teeth?

Teeth grinding is not unusual in children. It is not usually a damaging habit because children’s teeth and jaws change and grow so quickly. Typically, treatment for kids is not required.

Procrastinating a Dental Visit?

Whether being busy, or having anxiety about going to the dentist, procrastinating a visit can have serious consequences.

When we see a patient due to pain or sensitivity, often this pain and the treatment they consequently have to receive could have been prevented. In some cases, the issued could have been avoided by maintaining proper oral hygiene and dental checkups every six months.

Checkups allow dentist to help you prevent issues or catch issues early. Early detection, before symptoms of pain appear, is often extremely important and can dramatically reduce the amount of treatment needed.

There is a higher chance of cavities forming, gum disease, or a number of other oral issues in the duration of a dental absence. This can lead to tons of dreadful side effects, including root damage, severe tooth aches, and even tooth loss.

If your little one hasn’t been to the dentist in over six months, they’re due for a visit! We recommend you schedule an appointment as soon as possible and continue to schedule regular visits every six months. In addition, if you experience any discomfort or pain, do not delay seeing a dentist. Making time for a visit will provide healthy and pain-free smiles to last a lifetime!

FAQ’s: Dental Talk

Questions about your teeth probably pop into your head while you’re brushing and flossing or even when you least expect it. But then at your dental visit, the dentist asks, “Any questions?” Your mind then goes blank. Still, we know you have questions, so rest assure; here are the answers to the most common of the bunch!

Is there any reason to visit the dentist more than twice a year?

Every mouth is different, so some may need to see the dentist more often than others. If you have a high risk for tooth decay or gum disease, you may need to visit the dentist as often as every three months. A person with good oral hygiene is usually OK with only seeing the dentist twice a year.

Is an electric toothbrush better than a manual?

The great debate: electronic versus manual. If a manual toothbrush is used appropriately, it can be just as effective as an electric brush. This means brushing for at least two minutes, twice a day with proper techniques. Electric toothbrushes are not necessarily “better,” but they do provide some ease to the process. If you are not sure, ask us during your next visit and we will help you pick the right one.

What is plaque and why is it bad for you?

Plaque is a sticky film, made of bacteria, that constantly grows on your teeth. As the plaque collects and hides from your brush or floss, it becomes hard and turns into tartar. If not treated, tartar build up will lead to gum disease.

What causes bad breath?

Bad breath originates in your mouth most of the time. A low level of saliva and dry mouth are common reasons why you may have bad breath. You need to control the bacteria in your mouth and neutralize the sulfur compounds that form from the bacteria build up.

I have a cavity. Why doesn’t it hurt?

Symptoms are not common with dental problems. You may not experience any pain with a cavity until the condition becomes severe. Don’t wait for the pain to get it checked out though. The longer you wait, the more difficult and expensive it will be to have it fixed.

 

Here’s The Scoop On The Tooth Fairy

One of the most exciting things about losing baby teeth is placing each tooth under a pillow before going to bed for the tooth fairy to collect in exchange for a token of her appreciation to find when you wake up. Our classic American Fairy was introduced all the way back in 1927 from a book called “The Tooth Fairy” by Esther Watkins Arnold.

What did everyone do before the tooth fairy?

During the times of witches and dark magics, it was a common practice to burn baby teeth as they fell out. This was to protect the child from being exposed to any dark magic or “bad luck”.

“A token of her appreciation”

Almost a century later, the Tooth Fairy is still paying a visit to the youngins and replacing their lost teeth with money. Commonly, the amount of money is based upon the size of the tooth. The larger the tooth, the larger the reward. But what started out as a small silver token in the tale has evolved into children earning cash!

When would these rewards come to an end?

This all depends on age and, most importantly, when all your permanent teeth have grown in. It is most common to stop seeing visits from the tooth fairy when all baby teeth are gone. I mean, after all, she is there to collect them, isn’t she?

Common Dental Hygienist Tools

Those shiny silver tools that are propped next to you in the dentist’s chair may look intimidating, but they’re not as scary as you think. At the end of the day, they’re just there to help fix any problems with your teeth or clean away any debris! Here are some common tools used by dental hygienists along with their functions:

Mouth Mirror: This guy pretty much speaks for itself. This is to help the hygienist get views of your mouth at different angles. It is also used to reflect light and to retract your lips, cheeks, and tongue

Air Drill: This compact air compressor targets and gets rid of any small, early areas of tooth decay

Cotton Forceps: The job for these guys is to grasp and/or transfer any material in and out of the mouth without disturbing or interacting with any teeth

Explorers: The name says it all. These guys explore and examine any tooth decay,  canals, and other things that look out of the ordinary. They have pointed tips which are either sharp, thin, or flexible which can poke around to find any cavities

Smooth Condenser: So what’s so smooth about this tool, you ask? It’s ends are! They can be round or flat,  small or large, and single or double-sided. The function of this guy is to pack cavity filling into the space your dentist cleared

Hatchet: The name may sound frightening, but this tool is harmless. It is mainly used when preparing for cavity procedures and removes unsupported enamel from the tooth. This guy has a one-sided handle with an angled pointed tip on the other side

Disposable Saliva Ejector: Ah, the almighty “spit sucker” that hangs out of your mouth to get rid of any excess saliva. This guy vacuums up any saliva, water, or other debris during procedures and cleaning

There are many more tools used, but these are the most popular of the bunch. So now that you’re aware of what these guys do and what they look like, don’t freak out next time you happen to look over at those shiny tools; they’re only there to get the job done and pave the way to a better smile!

Is Fruit Juice Affecting Your Teeth?

Ahh, fruit juice. It has amazing health benefits, especially being full of Vitamins and antioxidants, but did you know that it can take a toll on your pearly whites? Here are a few reasons why:

Fruit Juice is Full of Sugar

You know how it goes- sugar contributes to cavities and plaque, which, in turn, can lead to gum irritation and many other negative factors from sugar buildup. Since many fruit juices aren’t 100% fruit juice, they contain large amounts of sugar.

Fruit Juice Reduces Tooth Enamel

We’ve heard a lot about the wearing down of tooth enamel in the previous posts, so you can consider it pretty sensitive to what you consume and how much you brush each day. Fruits with high acid content, such as limes and cranberries, can have the most influence on breaking down tooth enamel, which our teeth need to stay hard and strong!

Fruit Juice and The Youngins

It is important to keep in mind that there is a difference when drinking fruit juice from a sippy-cup. The liquids are released at a slower rate, thus, giving the liquid a chance to stay in the mouth more. With that being said, there is a higher chance of cavities forming! A good way to combat any problems would be to mix the cup with water to dilute any sugar or acids.

All in all, fruit juices aren’t the bad guys when having it in moderation, but it is important to be aware of the possible effects it can have on your teeth.