Pediatric dentistry of fl

5 Benefits of Visiting a Pediatric Dentist

The Difference

Let’s face it – for some in past years visiting the dentist wasn’t the most fairy tale experience.  Put your mind to ease by selecting a multi award winning practice and the most loved pediatric dentist in Southwest FloridaDr. Tim Verwest, DMD & Associates who are specially trained and board certified for treating pediatric patients.

While general dentists can perform the same work, visiting a pediatric dentist provides a slew of extra benefits:

Office Decor 

We’ve got fun just about everywhere you look! From video games, to community initiatives and educational lobby experiences for children of all ages to enjoy!

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Better Training

Kids aren’t always the most cooperative of patients.  A pediatric dentist has at least two additional years of training beyond dental school solely focused on treating young patients.

In the additional training, the focus is on child psychology, growth/development, and learning all of the tips and tricks of the trade for examining and treating children.

Specialized Treatment

In the circumstance that your child needs more comprehensive dental treatment, pediatric dentists are specially trained to handle special needs and to children with extensive dental treatment needs.

Oral Health Care Education

Since Pediatric Dentistry of Florida’s staff work solely with kids,  we know how to engage in educational learning.  Even more, we have props and teaching tools that are appropriate for all ages. To become part of our dental family, please fill out the form below and we will contact you immediately as possible. Thank you and we look forward to serving you!

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Smiling Can Go A Long Way

Smiling is something most people do without even thinking about it most of the time. You might smile at a familiar face, something that you find funny, or for no reason other than you’re in a good mood. There is actually more to smiling than just a reaction to your surroundings. Smiling can actually make you happier, healthier, relaxed, and much more!

Smiling makes you happier

Most people smile when they’re happy, but smiling also makes people happy. Your body knows that smiling is associated with happiness. Endorphins are released in your body when you smile. Endorphins are the chemicals in your body that make you feel happier. Smiling even if you don’t feel happy will make your mood happier to match your smile.

Smiling relaxes

The same endorphins that make you happier can also make you less stressed. These endorphins spread around your body easing tension and acting as a natural pain killer for your body in any stressful situation. Smiling also reduces the activity of cortisol which is a hormone that is more active when you are stressed. The less cortisol, the less negative feelings which means more positive feelings.

Smiling boosts productivity

You’re more apt to work when you’re in a good mood. If you were in a bad mood and you needed to do something that wasn’t that enjoyable, you probably wouldn’t be as motivated as you would be in a good mood. we know now, smiling boosts your mood so smiling while working will make work more enjoyable for you.

Smiling is contagious

Everyone wants to make the world a better place, why not start with a smile? University of Wisconsin-Madison Ph.D. student in psychology, Adrienne Wood, studied the effects of smiling on other people. She concluded that sensorimotor simulation in our brains is what causes us to smile at other people that smile without even realizing it. The researchers concluded that we trigger the same emotional state in ourselves as the person we are mimicking, which allows us to make an appropriate social response.

Smiling creates trust

Imagine you’re on a street with vendors on it. One looks bored and uninterested while the other is making eye-contact and smiling; which one do you think you would go to? It goes without saying you would be more attracted to do business with the one that is smiling and looks happy. If you smile, other people are more likely to trust you because trust and happiness are usually related.

Although there are many reasons to smile:

“We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do” – Mother Teresa

Nighttime Oral Health Care

Keeping your mouth clean isn’t just a day job. It’s just as important to practice nighttime oral care as it is to keep your teeth clean during the day. The (somewhat gross) fact is, when you are sleeping, you are not swallowing your saliva. Eight hours of doing this increases the level of bacteria in your mouth, which can lead to bad breath and plaque buildup. Bad oral hygiene can turn into tooth decay or gum disease, so make sure you follow our steps to keeping your mouth clean at night.

Every night before you go to sleep: brush, floss, and rinse with mouthwash. This is the best routine you can get into to prevent future problems with your mouth. So let’s break it down.

Brushing

We recommend that you brush after dinner and before you go to sleep. Doing so will clean your mouth of any plaque buildup and will give bacteria less to feed on. Using an FDA and ADA approved toothpaste with proper brushing techniques will reduce your chances of tooth decay and gum disease.

The ADA suggests the following brushing technique:

Brush at at 45-degree angle to your gums.
Gently brush back and forth on all outer, inner, and chewing surfaces of your teeth.
Use short strokes as wide as your tooth.
Turn your toothbrush vertical to clean the inside of your front teeth.
Brush your tongue to rid of any leftover bacteria and prevent bad breath.

Flossing

While skipping the floss at night may feel like a shortcut, you’re not doing yourself a favor. Flossing helps clean your mouth in the spots your toothbrush physically cannot reach. If you don’t remove that plaque, bacteria will feed on it while you are sleeping. Also, plaque buildup can turn into tartar, which can only be removed by a dentist or dental hygienist.

The ADA suggest the following flossing technique:

Use an 18-inch piece of floss.
Wind the floss around the middle fingers of each hand.
Tightly hold the floss and insert between your teeth using your thumb and forefinger.
Curve the floss in a C-shape around the side of your tooth.
Gently run the floss up and down against the side of your tooth.
Floss in between every tooth in your mouth, and don’t forget about your back teeth.

Therapeutic Mouthwash

Therapeutic mouthwashes are different from your generic cosmetic mouthwash and do much more than just freshen your breath. They contain certain ingredients that help fight cavities, strengthen the enamel on your teeth, and prevent gum diseases like gingivitis.

Tooth-Friendly Holiday Foods

Easter is slowly approaching and with that comes increased pressure to eat sugary and stain-causing foods. However, you can refrain from indulging in these snacks and keep your teeth happy this holiday. Adding these healthy foods below to your upcoming dinners are not only nutritious to your body, but healthy for your teeth, and will make the Easter bunny happy to see, as well!

Cheese-Milk Products

Having a plate of cheese is a great substitution for a plate of chips and cookies. Cheese is healthy for the teeth because it contains calcium and casein. Casein is a protein found in milk products that strengthens the surfaces of teeth, preventing the growth of cavities. Cheese also acts as an antibacterial and its low pH level helps make your mouth less acidic.

Nuts

Like cheese, nuts contain calcium and other minerals that help strengthen your teeth. Chewing on nuts may sound like it could be a bad idea because of it harshness on your teeth, but in fact, chewing on nuts stimulates more saliva in your mouth, thus keeping out bacteria. Of course, if you have problem teeth areas, stay away from hard nuts. And never, ever use your teeth to crack nuts from their shells.

Raw Vegetables

Fibrous veggies are good for dental health because of their ability to act as nature’s “toothbrushes” that clean between your teeth and remove plaque. Raw celery and carrots are prime examples of fibrous vegetables. Not only are vegetables packed with vitamins and nutrients for your teeth, but also provide plenty of energy.

Fish and Turkey

Fish and turkey are foods high in phosphorous that help keep your enamel strong and healthy. Foods with calcium and phosphate help deposit lost minerals back into lesions caused by harmful acidic foods and beverages.

Procrastinating a Dental Visit?

Whether being busy, or having anxiety about going to the dentist, procrastinating a visit can have serious consequences.

When we see a patient due to pain or sensitivity, often this pain and the treatment they consequently have to receive could have been prevented. In some cases, the issued could have been avoided by maintaining proper oral hygiene and dental checkups every six months.

Checkups allow dentist to help you prevent issues or catch issues early. Early detection, before symptoms of pain appear, is often extremely important and can dramatically reduce the amount of treatment needed.

There is a higher chance of cavities forming, gum disease, or a number of other oral issues in the duration of a dental absence. This can lead to tons of dreadful side effects, including root damage, severe tooth aches, and even tooth loss.

If your little one hasn’t been to the dentist in over six months, they’re due for a visit! We recommend you schedule an appointment as soon as possible and continue to schedule regular visits every six months. In addition, if you experience any discomfort or pain, do not delay seeing a dentist. Making time for a visit will provide healthy and pain-free smiles to last a lifetime!

Milk And Teeth: The Perfect Match

To build strong bones, you must provide yourself with tons of calcium, which milk happens to have. In fact, it contains about 300 milligrams in one cup! So does drinking milk or eating dairy products benefit the strength and health of your teeth? The answer is yes, and here are some of the reasons why:

  • According to the National Institutes of Health, ninety-nine percent of calcium is stored in your teeth and bones.
  • Since baby teeth begin forming long before birth, expecting mothers should consume their “Recommended Dietary Allowance” of it: between 1000 and 1300 mg per day.
  • Milk and dairy products such as cheeses can actually reduce tooth decay.
  • Milk forms a protective coating on enamel that can prevent bacteria coming in direct contact with your teeth.

 

Overall, consuming plenty of milk and dairy can make your family’s teeth stronger and more decay-resistant, but, at the end of the day, incorporating a good oral care routine is key to preventing dental disease.

The Don’ts For Toddlers & Their Teeth

Baby teeth are more important than you think. They pave the way for a happy, healthy smile in the future. They most importantly create healthy habits of oral care to last a lifetime!

It can be hard to tell sometimes, but there are a few common things that can negatively affect the health of baby teeth. Here are the three don’ts you should pay attention to for you and your little one(s) at home.

  1. Putting your toddler to bed with a bottle: sipping on juice or anything that contains sugar can cause bacteria buildup from sitting in your child’s mouth throughout the night.
  2. Consuming unhealthy foods: Candies and sweets can be the perfect cure for that sweet tooth, but not for cavities and tooth decay. Be sure to eliminate foods with high sugar contents or closely monitor intake to wean your little one off frequent indulging.
  3. Infrequently brushing: Regardless of the amount of teeth your child may have, you must be sure that the right amount of brushing gets done each day. You may also encourage them to help you out to develop good oral hygiene habits in the future!

 

Here’s The Scoop On The Tooth Fairy

One of the most exciting things about losing baby teeth is placing each tooth under a pillow before going to bed for the tooth fairy to collect in exchange for a token of her appreciation to find when you wake up. Our classic American Fairy was introduced all the way back in 1927 from a book called “The Tooth Fairy” by Esther Watkins Arnold.

What did everyone do before the tooth fairy?

During the times of witches and dark magics, it was a common practice to burn baby teeth as they fell out. This was to protect the child from being exposed to any dark magic or “bad luck”.

“A token of her appreciation”

Almost a century later, the Tooth Fairy is still paying a visit to the youngins and replacing their lost teeth with money. Commonly, the amount of money is based upon the size of the tooth. The larger the tooth, the larger the reward. But what started out as a small silver token in the tale has evolved into children earning cash!

When would these rewards come to an end?

This all depends on age and, most importantly, when all your permanent teeth have grown in. It is most common to stop seeing visits from the tooth fairy when all baby teeth are gone. I mean, after all, she is there to collect them, isn’t she?

Plaque vs. Tartar: What’s The Difference?

fun fYou’ve probably heard of these two troublemakers before. As we all strive to keep these guys away and off our teeth, we want to establish exactly what they are, how they affect your oral hygiene, and how to tell the difference if you’ve been slacking on your teeth-cleaning program.

First, lets talk plaque. It builds up around the gum line and takes form of a sticky, colorless, soft substance. It is made up of food particles and saliva that form into a film of bacteria.This is the culprit for cavities due to the acid it contains. Plaque also causes the gums to bleed if you are brushing or flossing! So it is best to keep an eye out for this pest and have it stay clear from any buildup on your teeth. If not, it can eventually harden into tartar if it isn’t removed each day.

Now, let’s talk tartar. Tartar, which is hardened plaque, takes form of a yellow, yellowish-brown color and is hard, porous, and crusty. It is hard because it comes from the mineral deposits in saliva. This bad guy can not only cause cavities, but also gum disease and tooth loss. So you’d most definitely want to avoid tartar buildup at all times!

So now how do you actually remove these burdens from your precious chompers? Plaque can simply be removed by brushing, flossing, and rinsing on a daily basis. Tartar, on the other hand, is a little more difficult to get rid of. You would need surgery to remove any if it has has formed below the gum line. To prevent any of this from happening, the best solution would be to use tartar-control toothpaste while brushing and flossing vigilantly.

Dr. Verwest voted Hulafrog’s ‘most loved ‘pediatric dentist

HulaFrog awarded Pediatric Dentistry of Florida, Dr. Tim Verwest, DMD & Associates the most loved pediatric dentist for 2018. Hulafrog is a local site featuring all kid-friendly businesses and events around town. Readers voted for their favorite businesses in each category over the month of January. For more of the ‘most loved’ list, click here.

This is Pediatric Dentistry of Florida, Dr. Tim Verwest, DMD, & associates second straight year winning the ‘most loved’ award from Hulafrog. For more information, visit www.DrVerwest.com or (239) 482-2722.