Pediatric dentistry of florida cape coral

5 Benefits of Visiting a Pediatric Dentist

The Difference

Let’s face it – for some in past years visiting the dentist wasn’t the most fairy tale experience.  Put your mind to ease by selecting a multi award winning practice and the most loved pediatric dentist in Southwest FloridaDr. Tim Verwest, DMD & Associates who are specially trained and board certified for treating pediatric patients.

While general dentists can perform the same work, visiting a pediatric dentist provides a slew of extra benefits:

Office Decor 

We’ve got fun just about everywhere you look! From video games, to community initiatives and educational lobby experiences for children of all ages to enjoy!

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Better Training

Kids aren’t always the most cooperative of patients.  A pediatric dentist has at least two additional years of training beyond dental school solely focused on treating young patients.

In the additional training, the focus is on child psychology, growth/development, and learning all of the tips and tricks of the trade for examining and treating children.

Specialized Treatment

In the circumstance that your child needs more comprehensive dental treatment, pediatric dentists are specially trained to handle special needs and to children with extensive dental treatment needs.

Oral Health Care Education

Since Pediatric Dentistry of Florida’s staff work solely with kids,  we know how to engage in educational learning.  Even more, we have props and teaching tools that are appropriate for all ages. To become part of our dental family, please fill out the form below and we will contact you immediately as possible. Thank you and we look forward to serving you!

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Touch-A-Truck 2018 was a success!

We want to give a huge thank you to everyone who came out to Touch-A-Truck this year! It wouldn’t be anything without the help out staff and participants to make it all happen, and of course with all the support from our amazing patients. We are grateful to have all of you apart of our family and look forward to making more fun memories in the future!

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How To Get Rid Of White Spots On Your Teeth

What are white spots the spots on my teeth?

Whether you have had them all your life or are recently seeing them appear, white spots on teeth are very common. These white spots are a sign of mineral loss, and often point to thinning tooth enamel.

What causes them?

The cause of white spots can vary and its therefore important to know what exactly is the cause of your white spots. Some white spots begin during childhood as a result of using too much fluoride before your teeth were fully developed. These white spots likely formed from excess calcium buildup.

Another cause is poor dental hygiene habits, especially while wearing braces when the buildup of plaque can be hard to reach. Dry mouth can also lead to white spots. Without adequate saliva production, acids that erode tooth enamel don’t neutralize and therefore begin wearing down your teeth.

How can I get rid of them?

While some teeth can be treated with simple cosmetic procedures, other white spots require much more attention since they are closely linked to the overall health of your teeth. Common treatment plans for cosmetic fixes can be bleaching or porcelain veneers. The best course of action is to make an appointment with a Dental Care Center dentist to decide the cause of your white spots. Your dentist can then select a course of treatment that will protect the health of your teeth.

What steps can I take to prevent them in the future?

In order to prevent white spots, we suggest having regular check-ups with your Dental Care Center dentist as well as brushing and flossing correctly throughout the day. We especially urge those who wear braces take extra care in brushing and flossing routines to remove plaque build up in hard-to-reach places. In addition, try to avoid overly acidic and sugary food and drinks that can damage tooth enamel. Instead, choose mineral-rich foods like dairy products, meat and eggs and those foods containing lots of Vitamin D.

Tooth-Friendly Holiday Foods

Easter is slowly approaching and with that comes increased pressure to eat sugary and stain-causing foods. However, you can refrain from indulging in these snacks and keep your teeth happy this holiday. Adding these healthy foods below to your upcoming dinners are not only nutritious to your body, but healthy for your teeth, and will make the Easter bunny happy to see, as well!

Cheese-Milk Products

Having a plate of cheese is a great substitution for a plate of chips and cookies. Cheese is healthy for the teeth because it contains calcium and casein. Casein is a protein found in milk products that strengthens the surfaces of teeth, preventing the growth of cavities. Cheese also acts as an antibacterial and its low pH level helps make your mouth less acidic.

Nuts

Like cheese, nuts contain calcium and other minerals that help strengthen your teeth. Chewing on nuts may sound like it could be a bad idea because of it harshness on your teeth, but in fact, chewing on nuts stimulates more saliva in your mouth, thus keeping out bacteria. Of course, if you have problem teeth areas, stay away from hard nuts. And never, ever use your teeth to crack nuts from their shells.

Raw Vegetables

Fibrous veggies are good for dental health because of their ability to act as nature’s “toothbrushes” that clean between your teeth and remove plaque. Raw celery and carrots are prime examples of fibrous vegetables. Not only are vegetables packed with vitamins and nutrients for your teeth, but also provide plenty of energy.

Fish and Turkey

Fish and turkey are foods high in phosphorous that help keep your enamel strong and healthy. Foods with calcium and phosphate help deposit lost minerals back into lesions caused by harmful acidic foods and beverages.

Milk And Teeth: The Perfect Match

To build strong bones, you must provide yourself with tons of calcium, which milk happens to have. In fact, it contains about 300 milligrams in one cup! So does drinking milk or eating dairy products benefit the strength and health of your teeth? The answer is yes, and here are some of the reasons why:

  • According to the National Institutes of Health, ninety-nine percent of calcium is stored in your teeth and bones.
  • Since baby teeth begin forming long before birth, expecting mothers should consume their “Recommended Dietary Allowance” of it: between 1000 and 1300 mg per day.
  • Milk and dairy products such as cheeses can actually reduce tooth decay.
  • Milk forms a protective coating on enamel that can prevent bacteria coming in direct contact with your teeth.

 

Overall, consuming plenty of milk and dairy can make your family’s teeth stronger and more decay-resistant, but, at the end of the day, incorporating a good oral care routine is key to preventing dental disease.

Common Dental Hygienist Tools

Those shiny silver tools that are propped next to you in the dentist’s chair may look intimidating, but they’re not as scary as you think. At the end of the day, they’re just there to help fix any problems with your teeth or clean away any debris! Here are some common tools used by dental hygienists along with their functions:

Mouth Mirror: This guy pretty much speaks for itself. This is to help the hygienist get views of your mouth at different angles. It is also used to reflect light and to retract your lips, cheeks, and tongue

Air Drill: This compact air compressor targets and gets rid of any small, early areas of tooth decay

Cotton Forceps: The job for these guys is to grasp and/or transfer any material in and out of the mouth without disturbing or interacting with any teeth

Explorers: The name says it all. These guys explore and examine any tooth decay,  canals, and other things that look out of the ordinary. They have pointed tips which are either sharp, thin, or flexible which can poke around to find any cavities

Smooth Condenser: So what’s so smooth about this tool, you ask? It’s ends are! They can be round or flat,  small or large, and single or double-sided. The function of this guy is to pack cavity filling into the space your dentist cleared

Hatchet: The name may sound frightening, but this tool is harmless. It is mainly used when preparing for cavity procedures and removes unsupported enamel from the tooth. This guy has a one-sided handle with an angled pointed tip on the other side

Disposable Saliva Ejector: Ah, the almighty “spit sucker” that hangs out of your mouth to get rid of any excess saliva. This guy vacuums up any saliva, water, or other debris during procedures and cleaning

There are many more tools used, but these are the most popular of the bunch. So now that you’re aware of what these guys do and what they look like, don’t freak out next time you happen to look over at those shiny tools; they’re only there to get the job done and pave the way to a better smile!

Common Mistakes When Using An Electric Toothbrush

Electric toothbrushes are known to clean teeth more effectively than regular toothbrushes. However, if you aren’t using the electric toothbrush properly, you won’t receive the maximum benefits it brings to the table for your teeth. Here are some common mistakes to watch out for before taking home and using your supercharged cleaning buddy.

Making the wrong purchasing decision

It can be tricky when shopping for the proper electric toothbrush that is the most suitable for you.  Make sure it fits in the hand comfortably, with the size of the electric head suited for the size of your mouth.  Also keep in mind that if you have a heavy hand with brushing, you might want to purchase an electric brush with soft bristles to avoid irritating your gums.

Not brushing for the appropriate duration of time

It is known and recommended to brush for a full two minutes about 2 times a day.  Although some electric toothbrushes may have a timer, it is always beneficial to make sure you are getting the proper amount of time when fighting away those germs and bacteria.

Heavy-handed overbrushing

You should brush only 2 times a day for 2 minutes. No more or no less. Brushing more than 3 times a day wears down tooth enamel (which is something your teeth need) and may hurt your gums if you brush too hard.

Not replacing your toothbrush head when needed

It is time to replace your toothbrush head after 3 months of use, especially if you are noticing frayed or broken bristles. Brushing with overused toothbrush heads wont give you the optimal results you are looking for. Keep in mind that you should also replace your toothbrush head if you have been sick.

Tooth Sensitivity: How is it Caused?

It’s a hot summer day and you’re craving something cold for a refreshing treat. You grab a popsicle and start chowing it down. As you start eating it more and more, you get a chilling sensation in your teeth that causes you to take a break from eating for a short while. This is called tooth sensitivity; but you’re not alone. About 45 million people experience sensitive teeth symptoms at some point in their lives.

So what causes this very chilling sensation, you ask? First and foremost, if you’re experiencing tooth sensitivity, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have a severe dental problem on your hands. The two main reasons for tooth sensitivity are:

Exposed Nerve Roots: When roots become exposed to cold temperatures due to receding gums, it can trigger a pain sensation in the nerve

The Overuse of Sensitivity-Prone Products: brushing too hard, abundant uses of whitening treatments, and acids from food can contribute to this

 

Dr. Tim Verwest, DMD collects 930 lbs. of food for Harry Chapin Food Bank

Pediatric Dentistry of Ft. Myers, Dr. Tim Verwest, DMD collected 930 lbs. of can-food donations during their “Touch-a-Truck’ event. All food collected will benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida.

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